Friday, November 27, 2009

Sunday Morning Market

Unlike Malaysia where the Sunday markets are packed with people, Nigerians tend to rest on Sunday and reserve the day for church or family time. Churches are packed on Sundays. Which was the only reason we could drive through these market streets which are not passable on week days.

 

Note the houses above market.

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My wife has seen these little vehicles in India. In Nigeria, these are called Okada.

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As always, where would we be without the faithful garbage man, dutifully doing his work.

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A mosque right in the heart of the market.

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Although most stalls were closed, a few were open. We didn't stop here, our target was the Balakun Market as my wife wanted to get some small gifts for our trip back next week.

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The man in the middle.

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I wasn't so sure if these goats were going to be goat meat or be giving goat milk. Anyway, I have now seen more goats and chickens than I have seen cats and dogs. In fact, I have yet to see a single cat in Nigeria, be it a pet or stray. And the only dog, or puppy I saw was on the street being sold to a buying customer. I wonder what happens to all the dogs here. Something to ask my Nigerian counterpart tomorrow morning.

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These guys on the motobikes are waiting for customers. Their basically a taxi service.

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Church anyone?

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Below are pictures of the torn down old market and part of the new structure being built. This is the Tekushoe market, the only market in Lagos that is open 24 hours a day.

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So, finally at the Balakun market, we alighted and walked in search of ear rings and other gifts.

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Notice the amount of wigs being sold. And their not there for show. Nigerian women wear them constantly.

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Once upon a time, trains used to pass this way…

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This is actually the public bus in Lagos. Its small, runs as fast as our pink mini-buses used too and is always filled to the brim.

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Some more market shots…

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Familiar sight?

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Lastly, I nearly got caught by the local police for stopping in the middle of the highway to take these 3 shots. These house are built close to the sea. These are the real slum lands where people love on RM7/day.

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3 comments:

Crankster said...

Nigerian women wear wigs???

Think & Create said...

On our trip here, at Doha airport, waiting in the queue to board the plane, we met an Indian guy who was glad to see a non-Nigerian and mentioned that hair is a premium in Nigeria as most people there dont have long hair.

And I thought he was only referring to the men as most Nigerian men has very short hair while the women had stylish hair-do's. Now I know its mainly wigs. And I've seen secondary school girls who's hair is shorter than mine.

So I guess Siva Ramachandran is right after all about hair being a premium in Nigeria.

Crankster said...

Wow. My shoulder-length hair must be something special then!!

The world is strange.